LES FANTASISTES D’HAITI: IPNOZ

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Les Fantasistes D’Haiti: Panno Caye Nan Bois Chene (Celini, 196?, S/T)

Hypnotic spiritual jazz-esque biguine track out of Haiti. Vocalist Ansy Derose sounds amazing here. More info on the group here.

365 Days of Soul, #158

DIZZY GILLESPIE: BLOW YOUR HEAD

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Dizzy Gillespie: Manteca (America, 1974, The Source)

Dizzy first made “Manteca” famous back in the mid-1940s and it would become one of his most important recordings in terms of introducing Latin influences into American pop music (and obviously jazz).1 He’d go onto re-record the song many times throughout his career but if you’re looking for the funkiest one: here it is, recorded in France in ’73. Kenny Clarke is a beast on drums here but the whole rhythm section whips this into a jazz dance frenzy.

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MONTY ALEXANDER: MONTY DOES MARVIN

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Monty Alexander: Monticello (MPS, 1972, 7″)

Jazz single.

Speaking of undercover covers, this is such an obviously blatant flip on Marvin Gaye’s “Inner City Blues,” it’s kind of boss that Monty tried to pass this off as his own original composition.

365 Days of Soul, #70

ROYALE JAZZ TRIO: UNDERCOVER COVER

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Royale Jazz Trio: Routine (Roper, 1977, Modern Jazz Elementary

Dance instruction album.

A cool little jazz dance album that features a slew of cover songs masquerading as different dance practice numbers. “Routine” is, of course, “Django.” There’s also covers of “Theme De Yoyo” and “A Night In Tunisia.”

365 Days of Soul, #69

BADBADNOTGOOD: FEISTY

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BADBADNOTGOOD: Limit To Your Love (Self-released, 2012, BBNG2)

Pop and hip-hop influenced jazz album.

I was ready to move onto something else but I love that this is a cover (James Blake) of a cover (Feist).1

365 Days of Soul, #67

You can tell they’re riffing off the Blake version given how the signature piano chords begin both songs, unlike on the Feist original. ↩